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Road Schooling

Long-term travelling families need to take responsibility for their child(ren)’s education. For some, this may mean continuing on home schooling as they always have. For most it will involve a process of beginning to home school or enrolling their children in a formal distance education program.

Many refer to this form of education as Road Schooling or World Schooling, emphasising the idea that most of the learning takes place outside of formal lessons. Although the amount of formal school work done may vary from family to family, these terms do emphasis the incredible learning resource that is found in the environment and society that the travelling child is exposed to. A series of art... Read More...

Long-term travelling families need to take responsibility for their child(ren)’s education. For some, this may mean continuing on home schooling as they always have. For most it will involve a process of beginning to home school or enrolling their children in a formal distance education program.

Many refer to this form of education as Road Schooling or World Schooling, emphasising the idea that most of the learning takes place outside of formal lessons. Although the amount of formal school work done may vary from family to family, these terms do emphasis the incredible learning resource that is found in the environment and society that the travelling child is exposed to. A series of articles by our authors here at VagabondFamily.org and guest posts will highlight and emphasise just how much our children learn as they travel through ‘incidental’ learning; a fancy term meaning the learning that happens outside of a planned lesson.

Further, this section will explore the legalities and complications of a nomadic education away from an institutionalised environment. It shall discuss options such as the 13 ‘School of the Air’ public schools that are offered in Australia, to the legalities and formalities of registering for home education without a home base.

In our efforts to cater to the global travelling family community we will be inviting guest authors to share their experiences of road schooling and their jurisdiction. If you would like to share your experiences with our community then please get in touch

Several articles will discuss and explain common philosophies of home schooling, with links for further information and explanations on how it fits in with a nomadic lifestyle. In general nomadic families are mostly non-conformist, and the differences are often as marked as the similarities. Thus, in a discussion of the various educational thoughts that are followed by homeschoolers may appeal more to one road-schooling family than another. There is no guarantee that your children will have covered everything they would have covered at a school, but they will have learnt so much that they will remember and be able to relate to. As one road-schooling family said,

“As we walked away from the ruins, we could hear our children behind us discussing the differences and similarities in the Mayan civilisations to the Incan civilisation.” (Nancy, Family On Bikes)

We also offer some helpful advice and practical pointers on home-education and resources that are out there. The practicalities of carrying some of the bulkier curriculums, and the plethora of choices shall be discussed, though there will be an emphasis away from the ‘packaged’ or ‘complete’ curriculums.

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Great Smoky Mountains National Park: An 800-Square Mile Outdoor Classroom

Posted by Colin Burns on 13 August 2013 | 0 Comments

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baxter

America's most-visited national park, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, offers terrific learning opportunities. The park is like an 800+-square mile outdoor classroom with many learning opportunities including ranger-led programs designed especially for kids. Here are five suggestions to help you get started on a lesson plan.


Learning made easy: The immersive benefits of travel for kids

Posted by Alison Gresik on 29 May 2012 | 3 Comments

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I didn't get to travel much as a child. My daughter and son, aged six and four, have had a much different childhood when it comes to travel and I have two stories that illustrate the kinds of changes that have come about because we jumped into a life of travel with both feet.


Confessions of a Reluctant Homeschooling Dad

Posted by Colin Burns on 15 May 2012 | 11 Comments

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Dadandkids

My name is Colin Burns and I am a reluctant home schooler.


Roadschooling Highschool

Posted by Jennifer Miller on 17 June 2011 | 8 Comments

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Home schooling is becoming more mainstream in many countries. Most people don't bat an eyelash when you announce that your young child isn’t attending a brick and mortar school but then your child turns thirteen, and all of a sudden there’s a noticeable shift in public opinion. Questions and criticism from well meaning friends and family begin trickling in and you may find yourself questioning your ability to meet all of those "scary" high school needs.

I want to restore the confidence you’ve had all along, that you CAN successfully educate your child, from cradle to graduation.  I’ll tell you part of our story and share some resources that I’ve found helpful and that perhaps you will too.


Road Schooling, is it really that difficult?

Posted by Amy Page on 13 June 2011 | 0 Comments

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For many contemplating the "Big One", taking responsibility for the education of little people may seem daunting.  Go and get a cuppa, sit back and take a deep breath.  It's easier than you think!  In this introduction, we explain how so many of the lessons that school-children learn can be covered through travelling.  This article has it's focus on those little people who can already read, but are not yet of upper-highschool age.

 

 


Roadschooling early primary school

Posted by Tracy Burns on 9 June 2011 | 1 Comments

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The early years of schooling can be a fantastic time to travel as a family and roadschool. Travel is a fantastic way to offer authentic, experiential experiences. Of course, roadschooling young children is not without it's challenges. Today we're talking about ways you can meet all the areas of the early years curriculum through homeschooling on the road.